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Intranasal Medication Administration: Suitable Drugs and Devices

Compared to intravenous (IV) and other invasive routes of administration, intranasal (IN) administration of medications provides several benefits with regard to safety and efficacy. This route of administration is needleless, requires no sterile technique and is pain-free and well tolerated by patients. The transmucosal drug absorption offered by this route offers a rapid onset of action, with dosing and bioavailability similar to IV dosing.

Variability in intranasal drug absorption can be attributed to both drug and patient-related factors. Drug formulations should be concentrated and potent and of a volume of less than 1mL (preferably less than 0.2mL if possible). Physicochemical drug properties are of importance, as optimal absorption is dependent on the molecular weight and hydro- or lipophilicity of the drug. Lipophilic medications with a molecular weight of less than 300 Da are most suitable for IN administration. The patient’s transepithelial passage proves to be another variable affecting drug absorption. Abnormal nasal blood flow, rhinosinusitis, radiation to the head/neck, diseases affecting mucociliary clearance like cystic fibrosis, and cigarette smoking may all affect mucosal health, and therefore IN drug absorption. Drug interactions for IN administration are considered relative and include phenylephrine and oxymetazoline.

With regard to IN administration, most nursing professionals and even patients are familiar with nose drops or aerosol sprays like sodium chloride nasal spray or fluticasone. For those medications without a commercial nasal dosage form available, options for administration in the past have included compounding into drops/spray, or using a syringe and cotton ball. These methods may prove problematic due to immediate swallowing, rapid clearance, and posterior delivery of medication. A new option, drug atomization, now exists to address these failures in IN drug delivery. An atomized spray delivers small particles to the nasal mucosa rapidly and without regard to patient positioning. Three commercial devices exist for IN drug atomization: Mucosal Atomization Device, Accuspray Nasal Spray and Kurve Controlled Particle Dispersion. Although considered off-label use, the therapeutic uses of IN-administered drugs include seizures, hypoglycemia, opioid overdose, epistaxis and anesthesia. Suitable medications for IN administration applicable to the hospice population include fentanyl, benzodiazepines, ketamine, naloxone and lidocaine.1

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For information regarding nasal atomization products:

LMA MAD Nasal
http://www.lmana.com/pwpcontrol.php?pwpID=6359

BD Accuspray SCF
http://www.bd.com/pharmaceuticals/products/nasal-spray.asp

Kurve CPD
http://www.kurvetech.com/nasaltechnology.asp 

 


References:

1 Jen, C. No IV access, get MAD! Powerpoint presentation at: the American Society for Health-System Pharmacists Midyear Clinical Meeting; Dec 7-11 2014; Anaheim, CA.

2 Wolfe TR, Braude DA. Intranasal medication delivery for children: a brief review and update. Pediatrics. 2010;126(3):532-7.

3 Gallagher EJ. Nasogastric tubes: hard to swallow. Ann Emerg Med. 2004;44:138-41.

4 Pandey RK, Bahetwar SK, Saksena AK, Chandra G. A comparative evaluation of drops versus atomized administration of intranasal ketamine for the procedural sedation of young uncooperative pediatric dental patients: A prospective crossover trial. J Clin Pediatr Dent. 2011;36:79–84.

5 Tsze DS, Steele DW, Machan JT, Akhlaghi F, and Linakis JG. Intranasal ketamine for procedural sedation in pediatric laceration repair: a preliminary report. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2012 Aug;28(8):767-770.

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