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The contents of this blog contain topics relevant to end of life care written by our own hospice clinical pharmacists. Continue to check this site regularly for the newest post or subscribe to the RSS feed below.

Medication Reconciliation and Transitions of Care at End of Life

According to The Joint Commission, medication reconciliation is the process of comparing a patient's medication orders to all of the medications that the patient has been taking. This reconciliation is done to avoid medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions. It should be done at every transition of care in which new medications are ordered or existing orders are rewritten. Transitions in care include changes in setting, service, practitioner or level of care. Accurate and complete medication reconciliation can prevent numerous prescribing and administration errors. Medication errors related to medication reconciliation typically occur at the "interfaces of care"—when a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a health care facility. Common causes of medication reconciliation errors include inaccuracies or omission during transcription, poor documentation, communication breakdown, and workflow disruption.

Additionally, in hospice and palliative care, some patients may be too ill, injured, young, or disabled to actively participation the medication reconciliation process. Patients may need the assistance of another person (e.g., family member, significant other, surrogate decision maker) if they are overwhelmed in managing their condition, are not proficient in speaking or reading English, or face health literacy challenges that might prevent them from understanding medication use directions. When the patient is unable to actively or fully participate in the medication reconciliation process and has requested assistance from another person, involve the authorized person(s) in the medication reconciliation process. This involvement should occur at all interfaces of care . 

Medication Reconciliation Best Practices:

1. The hospice has a standardized medication reconciliation process in place that is completed and reviewed by the IDT within 5 days of the initiation of care.

a.Medication reconciliation needs to be performed at every nursing visit comparing most current medication sheet from EMR to med sheet that is in patient's home.
b.Medication reconciliation occurs at every IDT meeting where patient cases are reviewed.

2. Any discrepancies that are identified are clarified with the physician and/or pharmacy consultant within 24 hours.

3. There is a process in place to review current medications to determine which ones are related to the primary and secondary diagnosis and therefore the financial responsibility of the hospice.

a. First Verify – collect an accurate list of ALL medications the patient is taking. This becomes the “ONE TRUE SOURCE”
b. Second, Clarify – any questions about which drugs, which dose and which frequency.
c. Third, Reconcile by reviewing this list with the hospice physician and/or pharmacy consultant along with any questions or concerns in order to obtain clarification or revised orders.


4. Provide medication and medication reconciliation education to staff and consider as yearly competency.

a. Assure Staff Training includes at least the following:
        i. Ask the patient/caregiver before the first visit to collect all of the patient’s medications. 
        ii. Note any discrepancy between the prescription on the bottle and what the patient states he/she is taking. 
        iii. Ask about the use of non-prescription medications. 
      iv. Identify any combination of medications that may be contraindicated or medications that seem to be inappropriate such as those on the Beers Criteria.

5. Assure staff has access to AND a process in place to use up to date medication information and software programs to analyze medication interactions, duplication, adverse effects etc.

6. Assessment of the patient and caregiver's ability to administer medication should be done at every nursing visit so that teaching can be customized to their needs and to enhance the safety of medication administration.  Hospice staff can consult with the Delta Care pharmacist during the visit to ensure that questions are answered.

Many of these “best practices” are already in place for your hospice by using Delta Care Rx on-demand pharmacist services. Utilizing a staff properly trained for appropriate medication reconciliation with the patient or caregiver paired with the consultation and information provided by Delta Care pharmacists is an important partnership to prevent dangerous medications errors and curb symptom management issues that may be due to inappropriate medication use and interactions. Although data specifically related to medication errors in hospice and palliative care are sparse, one study found that all hospice patients had at least one medication discrepancy, with an average of eight per patient. Most commonly these discrepancies were omission of medications. Most drug interactions identified were moderately severe. Owing to the fact that polypharmacy often increases as a patient ages and/or becomes more ill, it is prudent to always perform accurate medication reconciliation at each transition of care and provide timely updates to medication profile to ensure that an accurate medication list is always at the ready.


References:
1. The Joint Commission. Using medication reconciliation to prevent errors. Sentinel Event Alert. January 2006; 35. Available from:http://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/SEA_35.PDF
2. Visiting Nurses Association of America. Patient Safety: Medication reconciliation and management. VNAA Blueprint for excellence. Available from: http://0101.nccdn.net/1_5/3d0/168/33c/A-Guide-to-Medication-Reconciliation-and-Management.pdf
3. Kemp L, Narula P, McPherson M, Zuckerman I. Medication reconciliation in hospice: a pilot study. Am J Hosp Palliat Care [serial online]. June 2009;26(3):193-199. Available from: MEDLINE Complete, Ipswich, MA. 

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