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Michelle Mikus, PharmD

POEMS: Patient Oriented Evidence that Matters

We’ve entered a time where everything can be searched on the internet, and now patients have wanted to be more involved in their medical treatment than ever before. Talking to a patient and their families and caregivers is often quite different than talking to another healthcare professional and begs the question “What is important to both patient and medical provider?” That is where Patient Oriented Evidence that Matters (POEMs) comes into play.

Two practitioners introduced the POEMs concept into medicine: David Slawson and Allen Shaughnessy from the University of Virginia. They actually came up with the concept from a formula: U = R·V / W. The formula seeks to equate the information doctors find to its usefulness. In short, the more relevant (R) and valid (V) the information is and the less work (W) it takes to find correlates with higher usefulness (U). With the internet at everyone’s fingertips, practitioners are suffering from “the information paradox” as Muir Gray from the National Electronic Library of Health states, which is described as so much information that they may not be able to find what they need when they need it. This is where POEMs can be useful.

POEMs must meet three criteria: a) address a question that a doctor encounters, b) measure outcomes that doctors AND their patients care about (symptoms, morbidity, mortality, QOL), and c) have the potential to change the way doctors practice. Conventional journal articles outline in high detail specifics about clinical manifestations, however this is not language that the layperson can understand nor will it ultimately affect them. Often journal articles do not ultimately answer a question. The advantage of POEMs includes communication that is centered on what really matters to the patient in a way that is meaningful to the doctor also. A typical POEM report would pose the patient specific question and then provide a bottom line before going into detail. This summary format makes them quite user friendly.

Evidence-based medicine, by definition, integrates patient values and expectations as a core feature along with both individual clinical expertise and the best external evidence. It is a process that starts with the patient presentation/question and ends with the incorporation of findings into the patient’s care, but in the middle includes literature searches and evaluations. By focusing the search and evaluation steps on POEMs, the patient will remain at the center of the care. In addition, information discovered has the potential to be more relevant and valid while requiring less work.

Sample POEM with hospice focus Olanzapine for intractable nausea and vomiting:

Clinical Question: What can be used to treat intractable nausea that has been refractory to conventional nausea medications?

Bottom Line: Olanzapine (Zyprexa) has been found to very effectively control nausea due to its broad spectrum of activity at a dose of 5mg at bedtime.

Reference: Atkinson SR. Olanzapine for intractable nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients not receiving chemotherapy. J Palliat Med. 2014 May;17(5):503-4

Study Design: Retrospective review

Setting: Palliative care

Synopsis: Multiple studies have shown olanzapine to be effective for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting however none had previously studied the drug for non-chemotherapy receiving patients with intractable nausea. This type of nausea reduces the quality of life for patients and often results in multiple trials of different medications—sometimes in combination. Patients averaging 65 years in age that were not receiving chemotherapy were initiated scheduled olanzapine 5mg at bedtime. The need for other anti-emetics and rescue anti-emetics was significantly reduced and there were no extrapyramidal side effects reported. One patient required a reduction in dose to 2.5mg at bedtime due to somnolence. Overall, olanzapine has proven again to be effective in addition to being cost effective and its use in intractable nausea and vomiting will reduce drug interactions and polypharmacy.


References:

1. Shaughnessy AF, Slawson DC, Bennett JH. Becoming an information master: a guidebook to the medical information jungle. J Fam Pract. 1994;39:489-499.

2. Smith, Richard. A POEM a week for the BMJ. BMJ 2002;325:983 3. Smith, Richard. What clinical information do doctors need? BMJ 1996;313:1062-1068.

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