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The contents of this blog contain topics relevant to end of life care written by our own hospice clinical pharmacists. Continue to check this site regularly for the newest post or subscribe to the RSS feed below.
Jessica Horsley, PharmD

Intranasal Medication Administration: Suitable Drugs and Devices

Compared to intravenous (IV) and other invasive routes of administration, intranasal (IN) administration of medications provides several benefits with regard to safety and efficacy. This route of administration is needleless, requires no sterile technique and is pain-free and well tolerated by patients. The transmucosal drug absorption offered by this route offers a rapid onset of action, with dosing and bioavailability similar to IV dosing.

Variability in intranasal drug absorption can be attributed to both drug and patient-related factors. Drug formulations should be concentrated and potent and of a volume of less than 1mL (preferably less than 0.2mL if possible). Physicochemical drug properties are of importance, as optimal absorption is dependent on the molecular weight and hydro- or lipophilicity of the drug. Lipophilic medications with a molecular weight of less than 300 Da are most suitable for IN administration. The patient’s transepithelial passage proves to be another variable affecting drug absorption. Abnormal nasal blood flow, rhinosinusitis, radiation to the head/neck, diseases affecting mucociliary clearance like cystic fibrosis, and cigarette smoking may all affect mucosal health, and therefore IN drug absorption. Drug interactions for IN administration are considered relative and include phenylephrine and oxymetazoline.

With regard to IN administration, most nursing professionals and even patients are familiar with nose drops or aerosol sprays like sodium chloride nasal spray or fluticasone. For those medications without a commercial nasal dosage form available, options for administration in the past have included compounding into drops/spray, or using a syringe and cotton ball. These methods may prove problematic due to immediate swallowing, rapid clearance, and posterior delivery of medication. A new option, drug atomization, now exists to address these failures in IN drug delivery. An atomized spray delivers small particles to the nasal mucosa rapidly and without regard to patient positioning. Three commercial devices exist for IN drug atomization: Mucosal Atomization Device, Accuspray Nasal Spray and Kurve Controlled Particle Dispersion. Although considered off-label use, the therapeutic uses of IN-administered drugs include seizures, hypoglycemia, opioid overdose, epistaxis and anesthesia. Suitable medications for IN administration applicable to the hospice population include fentanyl, benzodiazepines, ketamine, naloxone and lidocaine.1

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For information regarding nasal atomization products:

LMA MAD Nasal
http://www.lmana.com/pwpcontrol.php?pwpID=6359

BD Accuspray SCF
http://www.bd.com/pharmaceuticals/products/nasal-spray.asp

Kurve CPD
http://www.kurvetech.com/nasaltechnology.asp 

 


References:

1 Jen, C. No IV access, get MAD! Powerpoint presentation at: the American Society for Health-System Pharmacists Midyear Clinical Meeting; Dec 7-11 2014; Anaheim, CA.

2 Wolfe TR, Braude DA. Intranasal medication delivery for children: a brief review and update. Pediatrics. 2010;126(3):532-7.

3 Gallagher EJ. Nasogastric tubes: hard to swallow. Ann Emerg Med. 2004;44:138-41.

4 Pandey RK, Bahetwar SK, Saksena AK, Chandra G. A comparative evaluation of drops versus atomized administration of intranasal ketamine for the procedural sedation of young uncooperative pediatric dental patients: A prospective crossover trial. J Clin Pediatr Dent. 2011;36:79–84.

5 Tsze DS, Steele DW, Machan JT, Akhlaghi F, and Linakis JG. Intranasal ketamine for procedural sedation in pediatric laceration repair: a preliminary report. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2012 Aug;28(8):767-770.

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Delta Campus Pharmacy Student

Use of Nebulized Morphine for the Management of Dyspnea

Dyspnea, or shortness of breath, is a very common complaint in hospice and palliative care. Up to 70% of end stage cancer or COPD patients experience dyspnea.1 Opioids, such as morphine, have been used to relieve the uncomfortable sensation associated with dyspnea. Oral and parenteral morphine are the most well studied routes of administration for this indication. Unfortunately, systemic absorption of opioids can cause adverse events that may be considered unbearable in the hospice population such as nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, constipation, and respiratory depression. Oral administration of morphine takes 15-30 minutes to take effect and lasts about four hours.2,3 While parenteral administration of morphine takes 6-10 minutes to take effect and also last about four hours. Inhaled opioids have a faster onset of action than the oral route and considered less invasive than the parenteral route.2

The use of nebulized opioids can be considered an appealing option compared to the oral and parenteral routes of administration. However, nebulized opioids are not routinely recommended. This is because there is conflicting data as to their benefit. There are no large-scale studies testing the efficacy of nebulized opioids, and smaller studies show conflicting evidence. Some studies show that nebulized opioids are less effective compared to oral or parenteral administration while others show that nebulized morphine is equally efficacious to subcutaneous morphine.1,4 Some patients are noted to prefer nebulized morphine over other routes of administration.4

A systematic review of 18 clinical trials that evaluated all routes of opioids in the management of dyspnea found a statistically significant benefit with the oral and parenteral routes of administration but found the nebulized route of administration to be no more effective than nebulized saline. However, the authors of this review did note that there might have been insufficient data with the nebulized route of administration to make this claim.8 Another review of 9 clinical trials looking at efficacy of nebulized morphine in the management of dyspnea found that 3 of the trials had positive results, but the rest failed to show improvement after treatment. The authors note that the small number of subjects, variety of disease states, and different outcome measures limited the interpretation of the results.9 Based upon these varying results, the use of nebulized opioids for the management of dyspnea are not routinely recommended. If you are going to consider a trial of a nebulized opioid, then it is recommended to use an injectable vial and not the oral morphine concentrate. A review of the literature will find no place where the oral concentrate has been evaluated and one article that directly states that the oral elixir should not be used.10 There is some belief that the sugar-free formulation of the oral morphine solution can be used via nebulizer, however, there is not literature to support this. It is of note that all current oral morphine solutions are sugar free and that the sugar containing oral morphine solutions are no longer on the market.7 There is some concern if the injectable vial needs to be preservative free for use via nebulizer. This concern comes from the fact the preservatives can induce bronchospasm in some patients. This is a rare but sometimes serious side effect. The preservatives of most concern are sulfites and edetate disodium (EDTA), found in both oral and parenteral preparations of morphine.5,6 It is not necessary to use preservative-free morphine, but caution should be used in patients susceptible to bronchospasms. If you are not using a preservative free product, then it is recommended to monitor your patient during the first administration of the nebulized opioid for this side effect. Typical starting dose for nebulized morphine is 2.5-10 mg; this can be titrated up to 30 mg per dose. Alternatives to morphine include hydromorphone 0.25- mg or fentanyl 25 mcg.1 Doses can be repeated every 4 hours as needed.3 Morphine for injection should be diluted to 2 mL volume with normal saline solution, if needed.1


Submitted by: Shawn Millsop, PharmD Candidate 2016 at Duquesne University School of Pharmacy and Lorin Yolch, PharmD, CGP, FASCP, Director of Professional Education at Delta Care Rx


References

1 Ferraresi V. Inhaled opioids for the treatment of dyspnea. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 2005; 62: 319-320.

2 Bausewein C, Simon ST. Inhaled nebulized and intranasal opioids for the relief of breathlessness. Curr Opin Support Palliat Care. 2014; 8: 208-212.

3 Sarhill N, Walsh D, Khawarm E, Tropiano P, Stahley MK. Nebulized hydromorphone for dyspnea in hospice care of advanced cancer. Am J Hosp Palliat Care. December 2000; 17(6): 389-391.

4 Bruera E, Sala R, Spruyt, et al. Nebulized Versus Subcutaneous Morphine for Patients with Cancer Dyspnea: A Preliminary Study. J Pain Symptom Manage. June 2005: 29(6): 613-618.

5 Excipients in the label and package leaflet of medicinal products for human use. European Commission. http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/Scientific_guideline/2009/09/WC500003412.pdf Published July 2003. Accessed June 2, 2015.

6 Beasley R, Fishwick D, Miles JF, Hendeles L. Preservatives in nebulizer solutions: risk without benefit. Pharmacotherapy. January-February 1998; 18(1): 130-139.

7 Gold Standard, Inc. Morphine. Clinical Pharmacology [database online]. Available at: http://www.clinicalpharmacology.com. Accessed June 25, 2015.

8 Jennings AL, Davies AN, Higgins JP, Gibbs JSR, Boardley KE. A Sytematic Review of the use of Opioids in the management of dyspnoea. Thorax. 2002;57:939-44.

 9 Brown SJ, Eichner SF, Jones JR. Nebulized Morphine for Relief of Dyspnea Due to Chronic Lung Disease. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy. June 2005;29:1088-92.

10 Ahmedzai S, Davis C. Nebulised drugs in palliative care. Thorax. 1997;52(Suppl 2):S75-77.

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Shane Donnelly, PharmD

Prescription Drug Misuse, Dependence, and Abuse in the Elderly

Older adults are often left out of the discussion when it comes to prescription drug misuse, dependence, and abuse. Prescription drug abuse is an epidemic in this country, and it’s not just confined to the younger patient population. It is estimated that 11% of elderly patients abuse prescription medication.1

The elderly consume roughly one quarter of the prescriptions sold in the United States.1 Elderly patients often have chronic pain, anxiety, or insomnia that requires the use of potentially addictive medication. Additionally, elderly patients may not be adequately treated with their current therapies. These risk factors, along with social isolation, depression, and limited functionality, make the geriatric population particularly at risk for substance misuse and abuse.

Providing safe and effective care for elderly patients requires that signs of prescription misuse, dependence, and abuse are recognized quickly. The medications that are often abused can lead to events such as falls and accidents that require these patients to be admitted to inpatient units or nursing homes. To effectively manage prescription medication misuse and abuse in this population, the definition of substance misuse, dependence, tolerance, and abuse should be addressed.

Misuse- Prescription medication misuse is the improper taking of medication by the patient. It is most commonly by accident, but can also be intentional. Assess your patient’s ability to take medication correctly. It may be necessary to provide pharmaceutical education to your patient.  Examples include.2

• Taking medication differently than directed on the label due to poor eyesight or reading ability

• Doubling up on doses

• Borrowing medication from friends or family members

• Acquiring medication online to treat self-diagnosed conditions

Physical dependence and Tolerance- Physical dependence evolves from the continued regular use of a substance that results in withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation. Tolerance to medication occurs when patients need higher doses of medication to achieve adequate symptomatic relief. Patients with physical dependence and tolerance may display drug-seeking behavior that can be misconstrued as psychological dependence (addiction).2 Assess the patient’s current condition and medication profile. The patient’s therapy may be inadequate due to tolerance or lack of efficacy. Communicate concerns with the patient’s physician. The patient may then cease to engage in drug-seeking behavior.

Psychological dependence (addiction)- Psychological dependence is a state that demonstrates loss of control and/or compulsive drug-seeking behavior.3 These patients engage in medication use despite the potential for adverse consequences. These patients need professional help to overcome both physical and psychological dependence. At this point, it is important to understand that these patients are potentially putting themselves and others in immediate danger.

In hospice, it is rare for a patient to become psychologically dependent on medication. It is important to be aware of any signs of substance abuse among family members or caregivers. Recognizing signs of caregiver abuse is important to protect patients and provide the best possible care for the end-of-life stage. It’s important to listen your patient’s concerns regarding their medication and to assess the root cause of medication discrepancies.


References:

1 Culbertson JW, Ziska, M. Prescription drug misuse/abuse in the elderly. Geriatrics. 2008; 63(9): 22-31.

2 Agins, A. Prescription drug abuse: from bad to worse. CEdrugstorenews.com March/April 2012. Retrieved July 5, 2012 at: http://www.cedrugstorenews.com/userapp//lessons/lesson_view_ui.cfm?lessonuid=401-000-12-201-H01.

3 American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Methods of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association. 2000;199-273

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Jessica Horsley, PharmD

Music Therapy in Hospice and Palliative Care

Music Therapy (MT) is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals. It is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program. Although note-worthy and possibly soothing in nature, activities like bedside and lobby performances, background music and providing media players/headphones are NOT considered clinical music therapy.

Board Certified Music Therapists (MT-BC) work in a variety of settings including schools, nursing facilities, hospitals, and hospices. After assessing the strengths and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to, and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in the therapeutic context, clients' abilities are strengthened and transferred to other areas of their lives. Music therapy also provides avenues for communication that can be helpful to those who find it difficult to express themselves in words.1

MT has shown benefit for many conditions relevant to the care of a hospice patient. In dementia, including Alzheimer’s, MT can reduce behaviors like agitation,2 improve speech and attention,3 even make shower/bath times easier for patients and caregivers.4 Incorporating MT into Parkinson’s therapy improves gait,5, 6 speech and mood.7 Of particular interest to the hospice population, MT can treat anxiety,8 dyspnea9 and pain.10 MT is not only appropriate for adult hospice patients; it also proven exceptionally useful in the pediatric population,11 including those with Autism spectrum disorders.12

Benefits of MT extend beyond relieving patient symptoms. It can oftentimes be associated with a reduction in stress, as reported amongst both family13 and professional caregivers. Beyond the physical/emotional benefits of MT to patients, families and caregivers, it may even offer benefit to hospices seeking cost-saving strategies. A growing body of evidence supports that MT can decrease medication and care costs (by decreasing nursing visits) for patients, offsetting the cost of MT.14

 

Aside from cost-savings, MT offers another benefit over medications – it has only one true contraindication: patient preference. A recent survey of U.S. hospices estimated that MT is provided as a discretionary service by over half of the hospices nationwide. Further, hospices that offer MT report that it is more often preferred by patients than any other complementary treatment method.9 If MT is not currently offered by your hospice, patients can be referred to an independent MT-BC by a prescriber. According to the American Music Therapy Association, about 20% of MT-BC receive third party reimbursement. These payers include Medicare and private insurance. Additional funding sources may include state departments of mental health and/or developmental disabilities, private auto insurance, worker’s compensation, foundations and grants.15

Although many MT-BCs work in institutional settings, home-based music therapy (HBMT) is a growing field relevant to home hospice providers. These programs can include home visits by a MT-BC and/or instruction of spouses, family members and other caregivers in selected MT techniques, which can offer lasting effectiveness and cost-savings.16 Like many growing fields, more research into the provision and implementation, as well as efficacy and cost-benefits of this innovative service are needed, but the current body of literature suggests MT is a strong addition to a hospice and/or palliative care service’s complementary and alternative treatment offering.

How to find a Board Certified Music Therapist:
Certification Board for Music Therapists
http://www.cbmt.org/certificant_search
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

American Music Therapy Association  
http://www.musictherapy.org/about/find/
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 


REFERENCES:

1 Definition and Quotes about Music Therapy. American Music Therapy Association web site. http://www.musictherapy.org/about/quotes/. Accessed June 20, 2015.
2 McDermott O, Crellin N, Ridder HM, Orrell M. Music therapy in dementia: a narrative synthesis systematic review. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013;28:781–794
3 Ceccato E, Vigato G, Bonetto C, et al. STAM protocol in dementia: a multicenter, single-blind, randomized, and controlled trial. Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2012;27:301-310.
4 Ray KD, Fitzsimmons S. Music-assisted bathing: making shower time easier for people with dementia. J Geront Nurs. 2014;40:9-13.
5 Bella SD, Benoit CE, Farrugia N, Schwartze M, Kotz SA. Effects of musically cued gait training in Parkinson’s disease. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2015;1336:77-85
6 de Dreu MJ, van der Wilk AS, Poppe E, Kwakkel G. Rehabilitation, exercise therapy and music in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of the effects of muscle-based movement therapy on walking ability, balance and quality of life. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2012;18:S114-119.
7 Haneishi E. Effects of a music therapy voice protocol on speech intelligibility, vocal acoustic measures, and mood in Parkinson’s disease. J Music Ther. 2001;38:273-290.
8 Horne-Thompson A, Grocke D. The effect of music therapy on anxiety in patients who are terminally ill. J Pall Med. 2008;11:582-590.
9 Burns DS, Perkins SM, Tong Y, Hilliard RE, Cripe LD. Music therapy is associated with family perception of more spiritual support and decreased breathing problems in cancer patients receiving hospice care. J Pain Symptom Manage. 2015. In press.
10 Krout RE. The effects of single-session music therapy interventions on the observed and self-reported levels of pain control, physical comfort, and relaxation of hospice patients. Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2001;18:383-390.
11 Lindenfelser KJ, Hense C, McFerran K. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life. Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2012;29:219-226.
12 Simpson K, Keen D. Music interventions for children with autism: a narrative review of the literature. J Autism Dev Disord. 2011;41:1507-1514.
13 Choi YK. The effect of music and progressive muscle relaxation on anxiety, fatigue, and quality of life in family caregivers of hospice patients. J Music Ther. 2010;47:53-69.
14 Romo R, Gifford L. A cost-benefit analysis of music therapy in a home hospice. Nurs Econ. 2007;25:353-358.
15 How to find a music therapist. American Music Therapy Association web site. http://www.musictherapy.org/about/find/. Accessed June 20, 2015. 16 Schmid W, Ostermann. Home-based music therapy – a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare. BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:291.

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Holly Lassila, DrPH, MSEd, MPH, RPh

Domains of Wellness

What is Wellness? Merriam Webster defines wellness as “the quality or state of being healthy”. The definition of “wellness” in Mosby’s Medical Dictionary is “the dynamic state of health in which an individual progresses towards a higher level of functioning, achieving an optimum balance between internal and external environments”. In general, wellness means overall well-being and from a holistic perspective, wellness incorporates the dimensions of mental, emotional, physical, occupational, intellectual, and spiritual aspects of a person’s life. Each of these dimensions acts and interacts in ways that contribute to our quality of life.

Physical Wellness: A healthy body maintained by good nutrition, regular exercise and avoiding harmful habits.

Intellectual Wellness: A state in which our mind is open to new ideas and experiences and is engaged in the interaction with the world around us. This dimension includes the desire to learn new concepts, improve skills and seek challenges in pursuit of lifelong learning.

Emotional Wellness: The ability to understand our own feelings and cope with the challenges which life brings. Emotional wellness implies the ability to express emotions appropriately, adjust to change and cope with stress in a healthy way.

Social Wellness: The ability to relate and connect with others. Social wellness is our ability to establish and maintain positive relationships with family, friends and co-workers. Spiritual Wellness: This dimension is the ability to establish peace and harmony in our lives. It implies that life is meaningful and has a purpose and the ethics, values and morals that guide us given meaning and direction to life.

Occupational Wellness: The ability to get personal fulfillment from our professions or chosen career fields while maintaining balance in our lives. Occupational wellness means having commitment to our occupations that is satisfying and rewarding.

Environmental Wellness: The ability to recognize our own responsibility for the quality of the air, the water and the land that surrounds us.

In our own self-assessment and self-evaluation of the above dimensions we often discover certain dimensions that are balanced and others that we can improve on. Wellness is an active, lifelong process of becoming aware of choices and making decisions towards a more balanced and fulfilling life.

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