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The contents of this blog contain topics relevant to end of life care written by our own hospice clinical pharmacists. Continue to check this site regularly for the newest post or subscribe to the RSS feed below.
Holly Lassila, DrPH, MSEd, MPH, RPh

Health Literacy: Do Patients Really Understand What We Are Communicating?

The definitions of literacy range from the Merriam Webster definition of the “ability to read and write” to the National Literacy Act of 1991 definition of “an individual’s ability to read, write and speak English and compute and solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job and in society, to achieve one’s goals, and to develop one’s knowledge and potential.” Functional health literacy can be distinguished from literacy as the “ability to read and comprehend prescription bottles, appointment slips, and the other essential health-related materials required to successfully function as a patient.”3

Poor health literacy affects people of all ages, races, incomes and education levels and affects 36% of U.S. adults.4 According to Doak et al, the average American reads at an 8th or 9th grade level; however, most health care materials are written on a 10th grade level.5 Poor health literacy is of great concern within a public health context as demonstrated by the inclusion of “increasing health literacy skills” as one of the objectives in the Healthy People 2020 goals.

Basic health literacy is fundamental to the success of each interaction between health care professionals and patients. Low health literacy may result in poor self-care management, increased disability and morbidity, and adverse health outcomes such as ED visits and hospitalizations.4

Health care professionals working in hospice are often educating not only the patient but the caregivers and other support systems for the patient. Being aware of available tools can aid in supporting patients and families. Health communication materials which may be helpful include:

1. SIMPLY PUT: A guide for creating easy-to-understand materials. This is a publication developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which highlights many best practices regarding assessing and creating written information for the public on almost any scientific subject. [http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/pdf/Simply_Put.pdf]

2. ASK ME 3: This is an educational program designed by the National Patient Safety Foundation to improve communication between patients and health care providers and encourage patients and caregivers to become active members of their health care team. [https://npsf.siteym.com/?page=askme3]

3. SCRIPT YOUR FUTURE: This is a campaign designed to help patients become adherent with taking their prescribed medication regimens. Some of the tools included allow the health care provider and patient to personalize health literacy interventions regarding medication adherence and education. [http://www.scriptyourfuture.org/]

Communicating with patients is a large component of clinical practice. Being well versed in cultural competence, understanding socioeconomic factors, a patients/caregivers education level, and patient’s priorities or motivations can be powerful tools in the promotion of health literacy and clear communication.


REFERENCES:

1. Merriam Webster: An Encyclopedia Britannica Company. Available at: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/literate. Accessed December 15, 2014.

2. National Literacy Act of 1991. Available at: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/102/hr751. Accessed December 15, 2014.

3. Ad Hoc Committee on Health Literacy for the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association. Health Literacy: Report of the Council on Scientific Affairs. JAMA. 1999; 281(6):552-557.

4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2020. Washington, DC. Available at http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/default.aspx. Accessed December 15, 2014.. 5. Doak CC, Doak LG, Root JH. The literacy problem in teaching patients with low literacy skills. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: JB Lippincott Co; 1996.

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Michelle Mikus, PharmD

Death with Dignity: An Overview & Legislative Update

Death with Dignity has become a household phrase since People magazine published young Brittany Maynard’s story concerning the issue. As a result of her emotional experience and story, Death with Dignity and “right to die” proponents all over the country have been refueled to get bills passed and laws put in place giving certain terminally ill patients the choice to end their own lives. Working in their favor are five states that already allow patients the right to die: Oregon (law passed in 1994), Washington (2008), Montana (2009), Vermont (2013), and New Mexico (2014). It should be noted that in both Montana and New Mexico a court case must be involved before being deemed lawful. Because of this, there is not much utilization.

In the three states that have laws allowing physician assisted suicide, certain criteria must be met in order to receive a prescription for the necessary medications:

1. Patient must be a resident of Oregon, Washington, or Vermont.

2. Patient must be 18 or more years old.

3. Patient must be capable of making health care decisions for themselves.

4. Patient must be diagnosed with a terminal illness that will result in death within six months.

5. Two physicians must evaluate that all above criteria is met.

In addition to all criteria being met, there are waiting periods before some of the steps can be accomplished. This includes the longest waiting period of 15 days between the first and second oral requests to the physician. In addition, there is a 48-hour waiting period before the prescribed medications can be picked up at a pharmacy.

In December of 2014, Medscape published an ethics report focused on “Life, Death, and Pain” that was given to 21,531 physicians in both the US and Europe. The very first question was “Should physician-assisted suicide be allowed?” The results in favor of allowing this were 54%, which is an 8% increase since the 2010 survey asking the same question (statistics from the US physicians only). Not far off from these physician results are results from a recent Gallup poll, in which 58% of Americans answered in favor of physician assisted suicide and 7 out of 10 were in favor of euthanasia for terminally ill patients.

Many states have legislation in the works to allow Death with Dignity acts similar to Oregon’s. States include: Connecticut, Hawaii, Kansas, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. In 2012 Massachusetts voters blocked a right to die act with 51% against the act and 49% in favor. In early 2014, the New Hampshire House of Representatives rejected a bill that would allow such a law. Legislators in Colorado plan to introduce a bill in the 2015 session that would make physician assisted suicide legal.

There are many arguments both for and against laws allowing physician assisted suicide. However, regardless of opinions, it cannot be ignored that it is a hot topic and there will continue to be legislation throughout this coming year regarding the subject. Join us for a Brainy Brunch in December of 2015 to take a closer look at physician assisted suicide and the most recent news surrounding the topic.


REFERENCES:

1. Death with Dignity Across the U.S. Updated November 13, 2014. http://www.deathwithdignity.org/advocates/national. Accessed December 20, 2014.

2. Eckholm E. New Mexico Judge Affirms Right to ‘Aid in Dying.’ The New York Times. January 13, 2014. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/14/us/newmexico-judge-afirms-- right-to-aid-in-dying.html?module=Search&mabReward=relbias%3Ar&_r=0. Accessed December 20, 2014.

3. Kane, L. Medscape Ethics Report 2014, Part 1: Life, Death, and Pain. December 16, 2014. http://www.medscape.com/features/slideshow/public/ethics2014-part1. Accessed December 20, 2014. 

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